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Finally pressurized CO2!! Few questions for those in the know

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by TrickyD119, Apr 8, 2005.

  1. TrickyD119

    TrickyD119 Junior Poster

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    After a few weeks I’ve finally gotten my kH up to 4° in my 29g (started < 1) and can finally take my regulator, reactor etc out of their box (no controller*, at least yet).

    I’m going to start with 1 bubble every 2 seconds and go from there, but I have a few other questions also.

    1. In the beginning stages, when and how often should I measure my pH to most accurately determine where I’m at?
    2. Should I let the CO2 run 24/7 or shut it off at night? If I should shut it off, when should I turn it on and off in relation to lights on, lights out?
    3. What are the odds of Oxygen being an issue? Should I be running my sponge filter when lights are out?


    Can’t wait to fire this baby up, thanks in advance for any help.

    edit *: Initially had typed solenoid, I in fact do have a solenoid, it is a pH controller that I haven't purchased.
     
  2. Ian H

    Ian H Guru Class Expert

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    Re: Finally pressurized CO2!! Few questions for those in the know

    IMO 1 bubble per 2 seconds is a good start point. Check your PH at the start and end of the light cycle it should be lower at the start due to the influence of the CO2 injection. I run my CO2 24/7 but have a power filter moving the surface at night to oxygenate the water. If I don't do this the fish are at the surface distressed. Most purists would advise that CO2 is stopped at night.

    A compromise that I am about to try is the Barr reactor. This makes sense as in theory it vents CO2 without mixing significantly with the water.

    I would leave all filtration active and have a constant surface movement without too much turbulance. KH 3 is the theoretical low point to avoid PH crash, in your case I would still increase the KH to 5 or 6 to give some latitude.

    Check your KH and PH to work out the CO2 levels and adjust slowly to increase or decrease the levels. Above all watch the reactions of your fish, dead fish are not good for plants.

    Ian
     
  3. chubasco

    chubasco Guru Class Expert

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    Re: Finally pressurized CO2!! Few questions for those in the know

    They are if you bury them deep enough in the substrate :D When I was a
    young lad I'd bring home the suckerfish I'd catch with the black crappie and
    bury them in my mom's rose garden...outstanding blooms :)

    Bill
     
  4. Charles Crews

    Charles Crews Prolific Poster

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    My 7 dollar drop checker was the best investment I made regarding co2 management, you can find them on ebay all day long. I suggest you buy one and make up some 4dkh solution.

    The easiest thing to do is to hook the co2 to the same timer your lights are on.

    If you are using the co2 ppm chart (which everyone is steering away from now) I suggest you get a reading right before the lights come on and right before they go off to get an idea of the min to max delta. Make all your assumptions off of the reading that is taken right before the lights go out. But buy a drop checker way more bang for your buck than a ph controller.
     
  5. Matsyendra

    Matsyendra Junior Poster

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    If you are adding phosphate, then pH is not a reliable indicator of your CO2 levels. You would do well to get (or build) a drop checker. With a glance you will have a "better" indicator, but it will still be a bit of a guess-timate.
     
  6. chopsticks

    chopsticks Prolific Poster

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    Did you notice that this thread is 6 years old?
     
  7. Charles Crews

    Charles Crews Prolific Poster

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    I certainly did not.... oh well hope he wasn't sitting by his computer the entire time waiting for a reply...
     
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