Eleocharis species, question

jonny_ftm

Guru Class Expert
Mar 5, 2009
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Hi,

My nano (link in signature) is growing emersed E. Tenellus. I find it too invasive with its runners and fast decaying leaves. Furthermore, it looks too short as a background for my setup.

I hesitate between Eleocharis species or Blyxa. Lilaeopsis brasiliensis looks too short for my setup

Basically, I'm looking for a plant less invasive than tenellus and especially with leaves lasting as long as crypts and swords. I don't like to deal with too frequent trimming and removing endless decaying leaves like with stems.

I heard Blyxa is an annual plant, so will the Eleocharis fullfill my needs?

Great thanks for your help
 

nipat

Guru Class Expert
May 23, 2009
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jonny_ftm;39329 said:
--

I heard Blyxa is an annual plant--p

If annual plants means they will die after flowering.
I bought mine (not sure if they're Japonica or Echinosperma)
while they were flowering. Still doing fine, 4-5 months now.
 

jonny_ftm

Guru Class Expert
Mar 5, 2009
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I ended up removing the Tenellus and replacing with Eleocharis. Better now than once immersed
 

Biollante

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Jun 21, 2009
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jonny_ftm;39329 said:
Hi,

My nano (link in signature) is growing emersed E. Tenellus. I find it too invasive with its runners and fast decaying leaves. Furthermore, it looks too short as a background for my setup.

I hesitate between Eleocharis species or Blyxa. Lilaeopsis brasiliensis looks too short for my setup

Basically, I'm looking for a plant less invasive than tenellus and especially with leaves lasting as long as crypts and swords. I don't like to deal with too frequent trimming and removing endless decaying leaves like with stems.

I heard Blyxa is an annual plant, so will the Eleocharis fullfill my needs?

Great thanks for your help

Hi,

Annual plant I think generally refers "seed to seed" usually a growing season.

I don't think Blyxa is an annual, since they can be propagated via cuttings.

Lilaeopsis brasiliensis would be half the height of Blyxa Echinosperma

Eleocharis acicularis is I think the choice you want; I don’t believe eleocharis parvula will get much taller than Lilaeopsis brasiliensis. The other Eleocharis', I am familiar with grow much taller.

Eleocharis will certainly be easier to grow than Blyxa Echinosperma. If you can get it and don’t mind a bit of a challenge, Blyxa japonica is an interesting plant (I have no direct experience with B japonica).

If you go with Blyxa, I would recommend dense planting.

Depending on the look you’re going for a little Monosolenium tenerum attached to rock interspersed with either eleocharis parvula or Eleocharis acicularis makes for a nice look.

When it comes to matters of artistic interpretations, I am likely the last entity you should trust.:mad:

Biollante
 

jonny_ftm

Guru Class Expert
Mar 5, 2009
821
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I got my self 2 pots of Eleocharis acicularis that I'll put in soil tomorrow

The tenellus was incredibly spread, runners across the tank length, that is up to 30-40cm long. This dry start is really growing like crazy