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efficient KH-using plants

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by tedr108, Feb 9, 2009.

  1. tedr108

    tedr108 Lifetime Charter Member
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    Any of you plant gurus out there able to list a few of the plants (for a non-CO2 tank) that are efficient KH users for getting carbon? I'm thinking that these would be easy plants to keep in a non-CO2 tank because I can easily add baking soda (sodium bicarbonate) to keep them "fed" with carbon.

    Checked my KH yesterday in my non-CO2s, and it was zero. This makes me fairly certain that vals (corkscrew variety) are big KH users as that is the most prolific plant in my non-CO2 tanks. I would definitely be interested in a few others to add some variety to my tanks.

    Thanks in advance...
     
  2. Gerryd

    Gerryd Plant Guru Team
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    Ted,

    I could well be wrong (and probably am) but I had heard that Elodea was very good at this. However, it does appreciate cooler temps as well from what I have read.

    Hope this helps.
     
  3. tedr108

    tedr108 Lifetime Charter Member
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    Thanks, Gerry. Elodea reminds me of anacharis. If I can find any, I'll give it a try.
     
  4. tedr108

    tedr108 Lifetime Charter Member
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    I suppose that another important question I should ask is...

    When a plant uses sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) as a carbon source, what remains after the process? I read the following:

    "Above 70 °C, it [NaHCO3] gradually decomposes into sodium carbonate, water and carbon dioxide -- 2NaHCO3 → Na2CO3 + H2O + CO2."

    [Perhaps a different reaction occurs when a plant uses the carbon.]

    If this is the case, is the effect of Na2CO3 [sodium carbonate] good, bad or indifferent in an aquarium? Perhaps more water changes are needed because of it?
     
  5. VaughnH

    VaughnH Lifetime Charter Member
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    Since the KH drops to near zero, the end product can't be sodium carbonate. So, it is sodium ions plus some anions, but I don't know which ones.
     
  6. tedr108

    tedr108 Lifetime Charter Member
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    Duuhhhh... That's a little embarrassing -- of course sodium carbonate would register in KH (carbonate hardness). Thanks for the reality check, Hoppy.
     
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