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Dry Start Moss With Blender And...

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by TinyLittleFish, Feb 12, 2018.

  1. TinyLittleFish

    TinyLittleFish New Member

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    Inresearching ways to grow moss onto driftwood, one way I have seen uses a method pioneered by gardeners. Making a slurry of moss, water, and yogurt, and applying to a rock or driftwood while having high humidity and plenty of light. Now I have seen disasters where some have put far too much yogurt in the mix with the result being a fungus and mould farm.

    There has been research papers regarding the anti fungal and mould properties of lactic acid bacteria, some specifically studying lactobacilli found in yogurt. There is this one talking about mould and fungus inhibition on wood (building materials) with staggering success rate supposedly in the synopsis.
    https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11274-004-7552-8
    There also was research regarding why honey was unsusceptible to spoiling.

    For a fungus and mould inhibiting "pesticide", the gardners were on to something with the yogurt. My question is, can the lactobacilli strain in yogurt be applied to the moss and water slurry in place of the yogurt? Can this even be acquired? Would it stay put, or even live for 3+ weeks to be effective?

    Looking at mould and fungus inhibiting products on the market, all that I have seen contained copper, and they advertise it will also kill off moss. Is there a product, natural or otherwise, that will be an anti fungal and mould agent? I know cinnamon has some of those properties. Would that be too spicy for the moss?:D
     
  2. Christophe

    Christophe Subscriber
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    Check this thread: https://barrreport.com/threads/blender-method.10730/

    I did a three-week attempt at this last year that more or less worked. It wasn't lush and well-covered right off the bat, but it was at least started most of the places I wanted it. It filled in without any other intervention. I skipped the yogurt or other foreign materials, went with a little bit of Aquasoil in the blend, to put a little nutrition into the mix. Moss is tough stuff, the blender really didn't take it down too much. It spread best by hand, pastry brushes didn't really work with it.

    As far as mould and fungus, anything that formed ultimately died off or got eaten by fish once I flooded the tank. I put some of my own tank water into a spray bottle, sprayed it 3-4 times a day.
     
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  3. TinyLittleFish

    TinyLittleFish New Member

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    @Christophe interesting observation about Taxiphyllum versus Fissidens moss attachment!
    Would you hypothesize that as well as roughing up the surface of application, chopping the moss finer might aide in more attachment points?

    Do you have a link to the photobucket album you referenced in the thread? Can't see the pictures at this time...
     
  4. Christophe

    Christophe Subscriber
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    Sorry @TinyLittleFish , the photobucket pics are gone. When they went to a pay model, I didn't go with them, and I didn't have the pics archived elsewhere. They really weren't anything too illustrative anyway.

    Yes, in theory, finer chopping would give you more smaller pieces, and so more opportunities for attachment. Just using the natural cracks, rough spots, and divisions in the wood gave enough spots that worked.

    Here's a current shot of the whole tank. The wood to the right has fissidens fontanus, the left has some java moss (taxiphyllum) variant. It's all pretty easy at this point, java moss more so because to reduce it, you just pull a bunch, concentrating on the longer strands, it comes back with a vengeance. For fissidens, I trim it, because if I pull whole strands, it seems a lot slower coming back.

     
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  5. TinyLittleFish

    TinyLittleFish New Member

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    Thank you for the picture link! Awesome looking tank! Highly amusing the two mosses you picked for blending are the two that are at the top of my list for trees.
     
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