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driftwood in brackish tank?

Discussion in 'Aquascaping' started by fullmonti, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. fullmonti

    fullmonti Junior Poster

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    Thinking of setting up a small mudskipper tank. Was wondering if there are issues with driftwood in brackish water?
     
  2. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Brackish is as brackish does...

    Hi,

    I do it all the time:D I am sure some woods are better than others are.:)


    If you can get hold of mangrove that would be natural, but I think almost any wood that is suitable for freshwater is going to be okay in brackish.:encouragement::)


    Biollante
     
  3. fullmonti

    fullmonti Junior Poster

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    OK good news. Have you any experience with mudskippers?
     
  4. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    A Fish Out of Water

    Hi,

    Yes, I keep mudskippers, they are not easy, but are totally addictive. A true pet, bright curious, friendly, well not to each other, but with us…:glee:


    Even created a Mangrove (Rhizophera mangle) estuary swamp, in what was once a beautiful but boring fountain in a courtyard, complete with tidal (sort of) action.

    I will write more in a day or two.

    What species are planning on keeping?


    A good overview.

    They really do need species tank, or better yet, kids’ pool. I advise against Periophthalmodon schlosseri, which are unfortunately about the most commonly available.

    Also, be aware they are very territorial and generally one male to two females is best, the problem being while they know whose who and what’s what, it is hard for us to figure out until it is too late.:nonchalance:


    Biollante
     
  5. fullmonti

    fullmonti Junior Poster

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    Thanks for the info! Would love to see some of your skippers if you have photos or a thread on them some where.

    I have done some research, knew they needed a species tank & the territorial part. The Indian dwarf mudskipper sounds like a good choice for the amount of room I have. Are they normally available? Any problems with them I should know about? I have two spots I thought about for a mudskipper home, one could be 8-9" x 4-5' long second could be 18" x 18 to maybe 24" long. Does this seem adequate for a male & couple female dwarfs?

    Jim
     
  6. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Bacteria Are A Food Group

    Hi Jim,

    Either or both of the tanks are adequate, in fact, if you were to partition the larger tank you could get two sets. I think the Dwarf Indian Mudskipper, Periophthalmus novemradiatus is an excellent choice. It may take a bit of looking to find, but worth the wait. Let folks know you are interested, I have asked a friend of mine that often comes up with hard to find species, I’ll let you know if anything turns up, for now prepare and search.


    One thing I forgot to mention and I noticed as I was looking through much of what I see on the internet.
    Whatever you do, offer the mudskippers more land than water. Many of these guys spend most (like 90%) of their time out of the water.
    • They always need to see and feel the water nearby that lets them feel secure,
      • but they love the land.
    • It also seems (to me anyway) to minimize aggression.
    • I know I made this mistake, thinking of them as gobies rather than amphibians;
      • amphibians that are far more at home on land than in the water.

    Make sure there are flat smooth areas but provide some terrain. They are mudskippers, provide some mud, it does not hurt to spray the areas down, better yet pour water over the “dry” areas at least once a day, twice is better, remember these guys live in tidal areas.
    Better yet, build them a mud flat and with a sump give them some tidal action twice a day.
    With a mud flat, mangroves can be planted directly in the mud and
    the mudskippers can burrow something they dearly love.

    Remember they are brackish water critters, I recommend a refractometer. I vary the salt concentrations a bit, specific gravity 1.010 (1.005-1.015) is good. Make sure that there is plenty of Calcium in the water, 120-ppm.

    Make sure the terrestrial areas are warm enough, providing a couple of warming rocks or lamps won’t hurt, their needs vary by species, 80-90 ⁰F is a good range, air and water, the air needs to be humid. Around here I use misters.

    Mudskippers are escape artists. Make sure there are no ways to climb out, period. Do not underestimate their leaping ability, it may be tempting to place a branch or something extending out of the tank, don’t. A secure lid is a must.

    For many families the idea of raising (culturing) food seems icky at first, but it is actually educational, fun and your mudskippers will love you for it. By raising it, you know what went into it and that you will not bring in disease and parasites.

    A treat, actually a food staple missing from the diets of many (most?) captive mudskippers is biofilm, good old slimy bacteria a real mudskipper favorite.

    More later…
    :cool:

    Biollante
     
  7. fullmonti

    fullmonti Junior Poster

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    Thanks, more good info!

    I have a saltwater tank, so no problem with checking specific gravity.

    I was kinda planing on having some of the return water from the filter flow over the terrain (driftwood root terraces) just to keep everything wet. Any suggestions on what kind of mud would be best? I live in Tennessee near a small lake. So would lake sediment work? We also have a lot of clay type soils. Not so much brackish marsh land nearby. I'm guessing it would be best to sterilize it some how? Have changed my plans to include more land area now than what I had originally thought. Haven't thought of a way to create a tidal effect in a tank though. Do you do this some how?

    I had read about them being Houdini's & planed on a lid. Hadn't thought about air temp though. Will have to watch that when I get this set up.

    What kinds of food do you feed and or raise? When you say bio slime, not sure exactly what you are referring to? I was thinking small earthworms & bugs like for reptiles.

    Thanks again for sharing your experiences. If you have any more info or links, all would be appreciated.

    Jim
     
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