Does CO2 really reach equilibrium state with a particular rate?

PeterGwee

Lifetime Charter Member
Lifetime Member
Jan 23, 2005
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I was wondering if it is true that CO2 will stabilize at a particular level for a certain rate say a bubble per 2 seconds (say 30ppm) after sometime and does not keep rising? Its sort of like input (CO2) = uptake via (plants & degassing from surface movement) I guess.

Regards
Peter Gwee
 

Spar

Guru Class Expert
Jun 5, 2005
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Dallas, TX
Re: Does CO2 really reach equilibrium state with a particular rate?

we may be on a different page here... but,

I can not get my co2 above 50ppm. I think this is due to having an open top Paludarium. If I up the bps any further, the excess co2 just bubbles out. So there is a max for me.

I think if you have a closed-top full tank and a good reactor, you could pump in unlimited amounts of co2.
 

PeterGwee

Lifetime Charter Member
Lifetime Member
Jan 23, 2005
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Re: Does CO2 really reach equilibrium state with a particular rate?

Well, what I meant was a say a fixed bubble rate. Does the CO2 level keep rising or does it plateau off at some point? What I heard was that it does plateau off but would like more views and practical experiences from you folks.

Regards
Peter Gwee
 

weaverr3

Junior Poster
Jun 12, 2005
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South Carolina
Re: Does CO2 really reach equilibrium state with a particular rate?

Well there is definately a saturation point with any gas, or any dissolved solid for that matter. So yes, at a constant input that is high enough (depending on you diffusion method I suppose), you should reach a maximum concentration at some point.