Distance Between Plants

C

csmith

Guest
I'm looking for a rough guide as to how to plant..plants. How far apart is an acceptable distance? Has this been wittled down to a science like everything else, or is it just far enough apart to not inhibit flow?
 
C

CL_

Guest
It also depends on what plants you are using, and how fast you want to have a "full" look.
 
C

csmith

Guest
Eh, good point..

I probably should have given some description of what my intentions were. This is going to be something like 70% learning tool, 30% looks. This isn't an all out aquascape, as I don't yet have the ability to pull off the scaping process very well. I will however, be using this to learn a little about aquascaping if that makes sense. I look at it as setting myself up for a bit of failure now, with success in the long run.

Given my intentions, I'm basically after something like should stems have spacing between them, can they be directly next to each other, which of those situations is best for rosette plants, etc.

Biollante/CL_, you both make a good point, probably easier to ask this question with a list of plants and desired effect. Perhaps I'll come back to the question when I have a concrete list to provide. Left C, I'll have a look at that video tonight. Thanks guys.
 

Tom Barr

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Staff member
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Jan 23, 2005
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Plants, as they grow, do this automatically.

So you can watch their group and canopy formations to see what is optimal, the plants decide this, but we can allow things to grow out good, then trim it back and replant to add denser growth but this is often only temporary.

Regards,
Tom barr
 

argnom

Guru Class Expert
May 24, 2009
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Montreal, Canada
I you use plants that propagate via runners, they'll pretty much fill out as much as the lighting will allow them to (hemiantus and sagittaria will take over the tank if you don't prune/uproot once in a while). So, I just plant them a couple of inches apart and they do the rest.

For stem plants that do not propagate via runners (like rotala for example), I try to plant them dense enough for them to look good while keeping them apart enough so that they still get light on the bottom leaves. Don't plant them so close together that water can't flow well, in my experience, they'll just die.

I've learned that you're better off planting sparsely than too close together. Anyway, the plants will grow and you will be able to add new cuttings later if the tank doesn't look good.