This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.
  1. We are after as many aquarium plant images that we can get, doing so will assist us in completing the aquarium plant database.

    https://barrreport.com/threads/aquatic-plant-images-wanted.14374/
    Dismiss Notice

Difference, if any, between "wet-dry" and "sump" filtration?

Discussion in 'Are you new to aquatic plants? Start here' started by rusticitas, May 4, 2008.

  1. rusticitas

    rusticitas Lifetime Charter Member
    Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    May 4, 2006
    Messages:
    216
    Likes Received:
    1
    Local Time:
    9:50 PM
    I am confused about the differences (and similarities) between "wet-dry" and "sump" filtration. After reading threads here and looking at products at online stores, I am lost in the details. Particularly because Eheim seems to have a canister filter labelled as "wet-dry", but many others look to my eye like sumps, at least in general physical dimensions, etc.

    When would one choose "wet-dry" over "sump" and vice-versa?
     
  2. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    18,693
    Likes Received:
    725
    Local Time:
    9:50 PM
    You may be missing the "wet/dry trickle filter box" in the sump only generally.
    But wet/drys have a sump, and plain sump, eg no wet/dry is just a plain sump, generally they use a sock filter and some sponge/biomedia.

    In marine tanks, the sump is the typical set up, using a refugium perhaps, or a large skimmer and maybe some live rock, and the sock filter.

    I'll likely convert most of my tanks to sumps once I move.


    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
  3. naman

    naman Prolific Poster

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2005
    Messages:
    57
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    9:50 PM
    "Sump" means no more than a "VESSEL" to put the biological, mechanical, or absorbant filter IN there.
    This is NOT a definition of what kind of a biological filtration is used.
    The same can be told about “canister” filters.

    You can put in a sump any kind of a biological filter:
    it could be "soaked" (traditional "wet" biofilter, whether "fast" as a canister filter, or a "slow" - as a Hamburger Mattenfilter),
    or "wet-dry" (as "trickle filter") - with the extensive contuct of media with air,
    or "wet" "fast" fluidized bed filter,
    etc.

    For example you can take a very big in volume "canister" and make a "slow" soaked biological filer inside - Hamburger Mattenfilter.

    As you (usually) can not put inside in a canister filter "wet-dry" filter as it is closed and has no contact with air, there is a misunderstanding.
    Eheim invented the way to put in a canister “wet-dry” biological filter giving media contact with air (BTW genies).
    So really in a sump could be “soaked” biological filter, and in a canister could be “wet-dry” filter.
    So both "sump" and "canister" are just vessels to put in there a biological filter. See?

    I see like term "refugium" is used when biological filter is a "plant filter", like EcoSystem Aquarium method (no skimmer, no calcium reactor, no massive dosing of chemicals etc) when biological balance is achieved with a Caulerpa (huge algae) growing in one of the compartments of a sump usually called "refugium".

    I have made recently a sump for a planted tank.
    This sump has a compartment inside for “slow” soaked biological/mechanical filter - Hamburger Mattenfilter, and compartment for absorbents – it is a plain internal filter Resun(R) P-1000L with Seachem Purigen inside (needed very rarely).
    Hamburger Mattenfilter could be made with Matala(R) mats or "Japanese mats" – approach is absolutely the same - very big surface area giving very slow water movement through every cm3 of media.

    For this sump I also made an experimental autonomous universal compartment (removable from a sump) – one size for tanks from 90x45x45 to 180x60x60cm with EstroSieve (plate ~50x60cm cost $200 but it can be cutted for 6 pieces).
    This is a best ever filter for a big planted tanks. Simple, cheap, stable, low maintenance.
    Takashi Amano used pumice in his sump for a tank 180x120x60cm (see photo 1, 2, 3, but using Matala® mats is a way better.
    One guy from Holland (known for his article about Redfield ratio) have made a sump on a Hamburger Mattenfilter several years ago, but he used a different scheme, no Matala mats, no EstroSieve prefilter, no MISTer PUMP (Hydor ARIO glued to prefilter cap of a Hydor SELTZ II).


    naman
     
  4. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
    Staff Member Administrator

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2005
    Messages:
    18,693
    Likes Received:
    725
    Local Time:
    9:50 PM
    Those mats do work well BTW.
    There must be a dozen reincarnations of the Hamburger Mattenfilter in a dozen languages. These work very well.

    It's odd more folks do not use such old school methods.
    I use biomedia, anything with high surface area that I can clean once in awhile.
    A sock micron filter bag.
    Not much else.

    Similar method for Marine systems, but either use a Skimmer or a refugium.

    The guide at the bottom is an excellent list of links for folks interested in using sumps BTW.

    "sump for a planted tank".



    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice