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Degassing CO2 from AM1000

Discussion in 'CO2 Enrichment' started by scottward, Mar 29, 2011.

  1. scottward

    scottward Guru Class Expert

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    Hi,

    I have a question regarding where to purge the gas on AM1000. Originally, I had the purge valve connected back to the intake of the pump feeding into the AM1000 (i.e. the Barr dual venturi method).

    This worked ok up to a point; at higher CO2 input rates the pump would start to get a bit overwhelmed with CO2 causing a lot of churning noises etc etc.

    So, instead of feeding the CO2 into the intake of the AM1000 pump, I put a seperate powerhead in the tank feeding a spray bar, and connected the purge value into the intake of this pump instead.

    Apart from the obvious addition of an extra piece of hardware in the tank (which I have hidden nicely anyway), is this actually a better approach that feeding back through the AM1000's pump?

    I think it's a better approach because:
    1. The dual venturi method will just pass the mist directly through the AM1000 anyway, the water in the AM1000 is already of higher CO2 concentration than anywhere in the aquarium itself - whereas passing the purge valve into a seperate powerhead located in the tank and misting it there will give the CO2 a better chance of dissolving.

    2. In the event of equipment failure, blockage etc, you don't risk dry-running an expensive circulation pump used for the AM1000.


    However - one thing that does have me scratching my head though is, with the purge valve open and the CO2 being redirected to a completely seperate pump - does this potentially mean that the AM1000 is being *underwhelmed* with CO2 and hence is secondary to the in take misting via in tank powerhead?

    Obviously my goal is to ensure the AM1000 is working at it's maximum with only the build up gas being vented to the in tank powerhead. I don't want the gas bleeding of to the in tank powerhead leaving little for the AM1000 to do.

    I know that the purge valve isn't just on/off, it can be turned. Would I perhaps be better closing it, overserving the build up in the top of the AM1000 (there will definitely be build up in my case) and then progressively opening it little by little until there is no build up anymore? My concern here is that there won't, in practice, be any means of "throttling" the rate at which gas purges from the AM1000. I'm thinking that perhaps if the purge valve is closed more all this will mean is that the gas pressure in the AM1000 will just have to build up more, resulting in an eventually "boom" through the in-tank powerhead, rather than a slow but steady bleeding of the AM1000 build up?

    I'm not sure if I'm making any sense here?? :rolleyes:

    Scott.
     
  2. dutchy

    dutchy Plant Guru Team
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    I also had the dual venturi setup fo some time, but couldn't find any advantages to it. It kind of made the AM1000 an expendable piece of equipment, because all CO2 went out through the bypass, not to speak about the extra CO2 consumption. So I'm sticking with the original setup. Works great for me.
     
    #2 dutchy, Mar 29, 2011
    Last edited by a moderator: Mar 29, 2011
  3. scottward

    scottward Guru Class Expert

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    I think the solution for me is to just let the air gap build up a bit, ensuring there is a check valve between the pump output and the input to the AM1000 and leave it at that. If the air gap gets to big, I need a second reactor and pump. Full stop. ;-)
     
  4. dutchy

    dutchy Plant Guru Team
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    With two AM1000's I never get buildup inside the reactor, simply because the bubble rate of both reactors is not that high.

    I modified the in- and output of the reactors to 3/4"
     
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