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Deficient and Excessive Nutrients in Aqua Soil Use

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plant Fertilization' started by Left C, Jan 28, 2012.

  1. Left C

    Left C Lifetime Members
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    This ADA article is from their newsletter. It tells us what Tom has been telling us:

    ==================== ADA Newsletter No.101 - 27 Jan. 12 =====================
    By AQUA DESIGN AMANO CO., LTD.
    Sign up: https://www.adana.co.jp/en/sc/mail/
    ================================================================================

    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    [KNOW-HOW] Deficient and Excessive Nutrients
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Whether in nature or in the aquarium, aquatic plants grow through photosynthesis. They absorb CO2 for this essential process but from the viewpoint of nutrients, CO2 is merely a carbon source. Besides carbon, aquatic plants need nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium as well as trace elements such as iron and manganese for healthy growth. If these plants are given an opportunity for photosynthesis only, they will grow big but may show some growth disorder including thin, poor stems and leaves, yellowed leaves and bleached new buds. The cause of these symptoms is lack of nutrients. Nutrients are the source of amino acid, nucleic acid and chlorophyll, crucial to the healthy development of the stems and
    leaves of aquatic plants.

    In nature, these nutrients are supplied in the form of nutrient salts dissolved in river water or circulating in lakes and ponds. In the aquarium tank, however, a certain amount of minerals supplied through the change of tank water but it is not sufficient in terms of both types and amount. Tap water contains a relatively high level of calcium and magnesium but no iron and manganese in most cases. Even if these elements are contained in tap water, they are most likely to be combined with other substances and become unusable to aquatic plants. For nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium which are actively absorbed by aquatic plants, it is difficult to supplement the required amounts to a Nature Aquarium which has lush plants just by water change. In nature, a sufficient amount of these nutrients is supplied by dissolution of organic matters such as the feces of living organisms and decomposed plants, but they are usually removed from tap water through the purification process. For Nature Aquarium, Power Sand and Aqua Soil containing nutrients and organic matters are used for the substrate for the purpose of nutrient supplementation to aquatic plants. During the initial stage, mainly nitrogen and minerals are released into the water from the substrate but the amount will be lower once the substrate is covered with thriving aquatic plants. Another issue is insufficient supply of phosphorus and potassium in contrast to sufficient, or at times excessive, amounts of nitrogen in the water. Another source of nutrients in the aquarium is fish feces and unconsumed fish foods. These are a source of nitrogen and phosphorus but cannot be relied on as an effective source of potassium and trace elements. As a result, Nature Aquarium in the initial stage is prone to excessive nitrogen and phosphorus, on the one hand, and lack of potassium and trace elements, on the other. Excessive nitrogen and phosphorus contribute to the growth of algae, which affects the appearance of the layout and hinders the healthy growth of aquatic plants.
     
  2. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    During the initial stage, mainly nitrogen and minerals are released into the water from the substrate but the amount will be lower once the substrate is covered with thriving aquatic plants.

    Well, this part for sure.

    Excessive nitrogen and phosphorus contribute to the growth of algae, which affects the appearance of the layout and hinders the healthy growth of aquatic plants.

    But not this part.
    In fact, this is easily and handily falsified and has been many times in many tanks over many decades now.
     
  3. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Still, much of the main message(most of it) is not much different than I've been nagging folks about.
     
  4. Left C

    Left C Lifetime Members
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    I know that Tom mentioned dosing K and trace on start up when using Amazonia along with the water changes. Also, I added some GH Booster that had K, Ca and Mg in it. This worked terrific for me. I got really good algae free growth. I really appreciate this advice!!
     
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