Cryptocoryne

Tug

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I've been nursing this plant along. Calling it Cryptocoryne parva, as if I really know what I'm doing. It's been a nice plant and before I order anymore, maybe someone would tell me if it is what I thought or just some other weed. I might even try this in a brackish water (non-CO2) tank, but could use some input.
If you have any experience with this plant, wassup? :p
What do you know?


DSCF0286.jpg
 

Tug

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Thanks Ekrindul,
I will see if I can get a better shot. My good camera is NFG after my last free dive. The plant in the picture, it has been growing in that spot for over a year and it has stayed pretty much just as you see it (except that it is slowly spreading.) Leaves are lance-shaped, about 2-3 inches.
 
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Ekrindul

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I would lean toward Parva based on the length of time you've had it. If it was Lutea, I'd expect to see larger leaves, more growth after a year. Parva is a slower growing crypt.
 

Tug

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I might just try it out in brackish water. If it does well, it makes a nice ground cover - even gets a little dark red at times.
 

Biollante

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You Asked...

Hi Tug,

My first reaction was that it is Cryptocoryne x willisii 'lucens' as the leaves seem too straight and do not have the paddle shape of Cryptocoryne parva. Both are notoriously slow growers that do well in low light. :)

Though the more I look at the photos the less sure, I am. :confused:

C. x willisii, C. x willisii 'lucens' or for that matter C. parva can take quite a while to take hold, all like enriched substrates and all will carpet a tank. I am quite certain it is not Cryptocoryne walker.

In any case, your plants appear somewhat anemic; I would definitely increase the iron and maybe dosing level in general. I cannot say for sure from the photo, but you may have it planted a little too deep.

As far as brakish water Cryptocoryne Spp. should do fairly well though C. ciliata, would be the odds on favorite. At any rate, I would not move the plant until it is well established. :gw

Good luck my friend,
Biollante
 

Biollante

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Upon Further Review

Hi Tug,

After using super-secret highly advanced photo enhancement technology, I still am not sure what species of Cryptocoryne, :( however I am sure the little guy is planted to deep. :gw

My advice is to gently remove the substrate covering the crown. :)

Cryptocoryne spp. do not generally like to be moved or fussed with, they do much better in pots if they need to be moved, ever. Give them a year or so after any disturbance.

You asked. I answered. You are welcome. :confused::confused:

Biollante