Co2 System Water in lines

Lars

Junior Poster
Jun 12, 2008
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Chilliwack, BC
Hi,

Sorry if this has been discussed before. I just bought a Co2 system the other day.
After running it fine at 1 drop per second for the day. I shut it off for the night (haven't bought a timer yet) and plugged it back in this morning.

Well, I plugged it back in this morning and saw no bubbles coming out and thought maybe it just needs a minute to get started. Came back 5 mins later still nothing. Ok so I turned the valve up to increase the pressure and saw that water was moving through the lines with the gas pushing it out. Did water come back through the lines over night?

How is that possible? If water pushed back into the lines where did it push or displace the gas too? I also noticed that the tank pressure had dropped from 900psi to 500psi and had a lot of sweat on it. What is leaking? everything? hahah... i'm lost. :)
 

shane

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Nov 29, 2006
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Do you have a perma-seal between your CO2 tank and your regulator. If there isn't a good seal there you can lose lots of CO2.

Do you have a check valve between your needle valve and CO2 reactor/mister?
 

Tom Barr

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shane;26103 said:
Do you have a perma-seal between your CO2 tank and your regulator. If there isn't a good seal there you can lose lots of CO2.

The voice of CO2 system experience. a check valve can also help and making sure the lines are very tight and well sealed at each point along the path.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Mooner

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Jun 9, 2006
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Lars;26100 said:
How is that possible? If water pushed back into the lines where did it push or displace the gas too? I also noticed that the tank pressure had dropped from 900psi to 500psi and had a lot of sweat on it. What is leaking? everything? hahah... i'm lost. :)

I would recommend a check valve for just this reason. The water can enter the CO2 lines after the solenoid is off due to CO2 diffusing into the water. On mine it can go as far as the check valve. Water shouldn't be allowed to enter the regulator.

The delay in CO2 reaching the tank is due to pushing said water out of the CO2 line. Shouldn't take to long though.

If your CO2 tank pressure is dropping while the solenoid is of the you have a leak between the tank and regulator. Try tightening up everything and check with soapy water. Some leaks can be hard to find.
 

Lars

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Jun 12, 2008
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Chilliwack, BC
Thanks for the quick replies. I see now. I have a white plastic washer between the regulator and the tank, perhaps I need something strong or more professional. I will go out and buy a check valve to prevent the water back flow and be more patient for the flow to start in the morning.

Also I when I get home from work tonight I'm going to soap it up and check it out. If there is any gas left by the time I get home :).
 

tedr108

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Lars,

Perma-seals are great, but in the mean time... Go get a big wrench and tighten that bolt between the tank and the regulator. I guarantee you it is going to turn quite a bit. I thought I had my bolt as tight as I could get it on the first day with the white plastic washer. I went back the second day and the bolt turned 1/4 to 1/2 of a turn more. Even if you get a perma-seal, try going back the second day and re-tightening the bolt.

I am still using the white plastic washer (though I got a perma-seal in the mean time) and my CO2 tank has been at 1000 lbs. for 6 months (and I'm doing 3 bps 10 hours per day).

The good thing about perma-seals is that they will probably last you a lifetime -- the white plastic washers are supposed to be replaced each time you refill your CO2 bottle.
 

Lars

Junior Poster
Jun 12, 2008
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Chilliwack, BC
great! that really brings up my confidence level. I was worried about getting it too tight and never backing it off so I'll get on that right away.
 

Mooner

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Panda;26161 said:
I have a paintball CO2 system. Is there a way for distributing from one CO2 source into 2 lines?

Sure, you will need two needle valves and a "T' behind the solenoid. Run around 20 psi on the regulator. I use this method on two 29 gal w/ skimmers. I'm able to run very high bps on each without effecting the other(ie. pressure drop)
 

Mooner

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Hard to say, maybe someone with that size can chime in. I use 20# tanks and I'm over a year on one tank at 4 bps. Much larger than yours though.