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Co2 reactor for 180g with sump

Discussion in 'CO2 Enrichment' started by Slythy, Jul 6, 2017.

  1. Slythy

    Slythy New Member

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    I have a 180g aquarium with a large sump and im having issues with my current reactors. I have 2 20" griggs reactors each powered by a quiet one 317gph pumps and they exit back into the sump. They seem to fill up with air (co2) rather wuickly since i have to put so much co2 into them im not sure that they can keep up. What size/style reacor will work for me. Id like to not plumb it into the return but i can. The return pump is a vectra m1 at about 40%.

    Any idea's? I just want quiet and efficient.

    Thanks!
     
  2. rajkm

    rajkm Article Editor
    Staff Member Lifetime Member Article Editor

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    Almost all reactors will have that problem. You can go bigger reactors or more reactors. May be you need a pre reactor like a sera or ISTA to chop up the bubbles and mix some before it goes to the reactors. May be fill the reactors with bio balls, which reduces water volume and helps with bubble being suspended longer.
     
  3. Rahul Jawahar

    Rahul Jawahar Subscriber

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    Use a more powerful pump. I had similar issue with my reactor in a 90gallon tank. Now i am running my reactor with 2500lph pump. No gas buildup, fine mist at outlet. I am happy with that.
     
    Nikolyator likes this.
  4. cjThomas

    cjThomas New Member

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    i started with a 1 1/2" x 28" griggs.... no sump and pushed with an FX6.... i use 1" ID at the pump head and interfaced with a 1" nipple to a 1.5" 90 elbow into a 28" length then to another 90 elbow and output via a 3/4" nipple to 5/8 line.... i had the same problem where i was having way too many bubbles escaping into the tank.... i didn't want to run two units or reduce flow ... the filter input is my only flow and sits at one end of a 51"x18 wide by 20 tall.... my I/O are at the same end, so i need all the flow i can get...

    my solution was to keep the 1.5" elbows at entry and exit of the griggs, but i cut out the center and installed a 1.5" to 3" coupler... then a +/- 15" section of 3" pipe, and then another 3" to 1.5" coupler...... it effective reduces flow by creating a low pressure area within the griggs long enough to suspend co2 to full dissolution (or near so) at up to 6 or 8 bps....just shy of a stream of co2 through the bubble counter.... and i can keep the fx6 wide open...

    thomas-modified griggs.JPG
     
  5. cjThomas

    cjThomas New Member

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    aaaaaaaannnnd..... call me a moron... lol.... you are having the exact opposite problem as i.... i couldn't keep co2 restrained long enough in the griggs... and your reactors cant digest it fast enough.... the only logical solution would be additional reactors (each with their own co2 input) and adding lower co2 flow to each, until each unit maxed its dissolution potential (ie: no co2 build up in each reactor) and you achieved the co2 level that you desired in the tank.... each unit can only create so much dissolution over time.... additional flow would help i would think, up to a point, and then it will just start blasting bubbles out of the griggs units...

    I just recently moved from an intank diffuser to the reactor... im still dialing, but so far i have found that i have to start my reactor earlier to obtain a 1 ph drop in the tank, but the ph drop regresses much slower (than the diffusion method) after co2 shutdown until i actively outgas after the photo period. basically i start injecting around 6am (3bps with 70gal 5dgh 4dkh) and have my 1point drop (7ish to 6ish) at about 9:30a; lights on at 10am.... gas off at 3pm, lights off at 6pm.... and ph regression to baseline by 9pm.... i use a lily pipe with light surface agitation and a surface skimmer that comes on for 5 minutes every three hours and then for 30 minutes at 7p.... drop checker stays the lightest of greens (just barely yellow) through the photo period...

    so my point is.... if you are flooding your reactors with soo much co2 that they 'fill up'... why not try backing off the co2 flow and starting earlier to achieve the co2 concentration that you would like at the time that you need it.... with all that co2 trapped in the griggs... it just sits there entering the water column after you close the solenoid each day regardless--it has no where else to go... lol... so it ends up in your water column... just not when you want.

    co2 is cheap... for me, trying to conserve it was a fools game. ive tried flooding the tank and forcing dissolution to happen fast in an attempt to 'save' co2 by keeping the valve closed for as long as possible.... ... in the end, using the reactor required me to be on the tank for an extra hour a day maybe, but the big difference was just shifting the on/off time relative to the photo period.... the diffuser seemed to drop ph faster, but outgassed faster... the reactor forced me to smooth everything out using lower bps and longer time ..... and the livestock seems less bothered by the swings this way.

    anyway... just noticed this thread is from a while ago... and i may have had too many martini's, lol..

    christopher.
     
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