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co2 problem.

Discussion in 'CO2 Enrichment' started by hmongronaldo, Nov 5, 2010.

  1. hmongronaldo

    hmongronaldo Junior Poster

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    i just hooked up a co2 tank with custom regulator. Im running 4 bubbles per seconds at 4psi. Is that normal?? Low psi is the only way to get 4 bubbles per second. Could you explain how this is possible? Everyone is running at 10psi and above.. So i dont understand. Help!!
     
  2. hmongronaldo

    hmongronaldo Junior Poster

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    i meant... 1 bubble per 4 seconds.
     
  3. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    I'm confused as to what you are really asking. Please restate the question.
     
  4. pepetj

    pepetj Lifetime Members
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    I believe he is getting one bubble of CO2 in its bubble counter every four seconds which means [60 secs/1 min]* [1bubble/4secs] = 15 bubbles per minute; in order to get this rate he has to turn down the secondary stage to 4 psi when most people report around 10 psi or more.

    I think this is what he's asking: Is 4psi OK if I get 15 bubbles per minute? Of course the answer finally lies in what level of dissolved CO2 the tank is managing.

    As a rule of thumb I wouldn't mind much on the psi of the secondary stage as long as I get a somewhat stable CO2 bubble rate that results in levels of dissolved CO2 within my target range.

    Pepetj
    Santo Domingo
     
  5. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    Your needle valve is the best way to get a bubble count that low despite a working pressure of 10+ psi. Do you have a needle valve? If you get a stable bubble count at 4psi (working pressure), then what's the problem?

    Do you want a rate of 1 bubble per 4 seconds?
     
  6. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    The quality of your needle valve will determine what you can flow at higher pressures. Do you have a single, or dual, stage regulator? This will also determine how stable your CO2 flow is. If you have a dual stage regulator and a higher quality needle valve you should be able to run 15-30 PSI and still get 15 BPM and less if you wanted to.

    If may help to know the brand name on the regulator and on the needle valve so that others can chime in on what might be considered "normal" for that combination.

    -
    S
     
  7. Matt F.

    Matt F. Lifetime Charter Member
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    +1 Good advice.
     
  8. Htomassini

    Htomassini Guest

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    I was under the impression that the normal working pressure was 1 psi, did i miss anything? ( i am using a read sea co2 reg and inline needle valve)

    thanks
     
  9. hbosman

    hbosman Guru Class Expert

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    If I remember correctly, the recommended working pressure of a RedSea regulator was 15 psi.
     
  10. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    Higher working pressures have a couple of advantages. One is that they will work with disc diffusors where a lower pressure might not. Another is stability in pressure delivery. Some temperature swings over the course of a day can alter the pressure in the CO2 tank and can cause a higher/lower flow at different times of the day. Higher pressures are less prone to this. The real fix to this is to have a better regulator, but if you have one that doesn't deal with varying pressures well, then when you make adjustments to your CO2 can also become important. Usually not a big deal for most, but I bring it up because some people have open stands or cylinders outside the stand where they may swing in temperature over the day. I set mine to ~15 PSI and haven't touched it since.

    -
    S

     
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