CO2 adaptation of algae and plants

Tom Barr

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Below is a link to a good paper for aquatic plants and CO2 uptake.

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0028-646X(198112)89:4<557:RTCDFI>2.0.CO;2-U

http://links.jstor.org/sici?sici=0028-646X(198102)87:2<269:TDAOAP>2.0.CO;2-W&size=LARGE

http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/links/doi/10.1046/j.1365-3040.1999.00460.x/full/

http://www.springerlink.com/(bebzaw...,301,539;linkingpublicationresults,1:100458,1

Transportation issues with CO2 in plants:
http://www.springerlink.com/(sg4qb3...,233,539;linkingpublicationresults,1:100458,1

Boundary layer issues:

http://www.springerlink.com/(bjs2jq...l,23,235;linkingpublicationresults,1:100325,1

Good carbon article in relations to algae

http://journals.cambridge.org/production/action/cjoGetFulltext?fulltextid=47400

And some evidence of the possible reasoning for BBA in poor CO2 planted tanks:

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/nrc/cjb/2005/00000083/00000007/art00021

You'll note that these Red algae can be potentially CO2 limited, since they lack a CCM, by not doing water changes, adding lots of plants, this suggest a reason why we do not see BBA in non CO2 planted tanks.

It does not suggest why we do not see BBA at high stable levels of CO2 though.
So we may have only 1/2 of the picture.

Steve's PhD is very good on this topic of CO2 adaptations:
http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/nrc/cjb/2005/00000083/00000007/art00021
 

srozell

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Re: CO2 adaptation of algae and plants

These all look very informative, but I can't be sure as I don't understand about every second word in each of the summaries. I'll trust that you've read them all, that YOU understand them, and you will tell us if we need to change anything. :confused:
 

Tom Barr

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Re: CO2 adaptation of algae and plants

You do not need to understand all of it, some parts is better than no parts:)

It also gives a basis for nutty ideas I come up with and suggest.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

srozell

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Re: CO2 adaptation of algae and plants

LOL, I think you post stuff like this just to convince us we are morons in your presense. :D

... of course I could be the only one that has difficulty with the reading...
 

Tom Barr

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Re: CO2 adaptation of algae and plants

Well, I did not always do this, I cut meat for 12 years, worked in the factory etc.

If I can grasp it, with a lot of work, so can others. It's no big deal if you cannot, you can still learn to grow plants great, but if you want to know why and what is around that supports such contentions, this stuff will help.
I hardly am the ivory tower attitude.
I try to learn what I can.


Regards,
Tom Barr
 

VaughnH

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Re: CO2 adaptation of algae and plants

srozell said:
LOL, I think you post stuff like this just to convince us we are morons in your presense. :D

... of course I could be the only one that has difficulty with the reading...

Oh, no question, you are probably the only one who has any problem understanding all of those articles on first reading, while watching the NFL championships. Piece of cake. Elementary. If I weren't so busy right now I would summarize each of them for you.
 

brad

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Re: CO2 adaptation of algae and plants

I`d like a little clarification.

quote:''The difference between protoplast and plant values is greatest above pH 8 ( Fig. 4), possibly indicating a larger contribution of HCO3 to whole plant photosynthesis than to protoplast photosynthesis at similar external pH values ( Newman & Raven 1993). CA activity increases with increasing external pH ( Newman & Raven 1993) and the lower levels detected in intact protoplasts (external to, but associated with plasmalemma) may hinder sufficiently rapid conversion of HCO3 to CO2 at pH values greater than 8·0, reducing the rate of supply of CO2 to the chloroplast and, hence, the observed rate of photosynthesis.''


Does this mean that at ph`s above 8, plants have a harder time using co2 and therefore a reduced growth rate, or simply that if the difference in ph the dic causes is insignificant that the growth rate is reduced (which we all know already)

Thanks
 

Tom Barr

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Re: CO2 adaptation of algae and plants

brad said:
I`d like a little clarification.

quote:''The difference between protoplast and plant values is greatest above pH 8 ( Fig. 4), possibly indicating a larger contribution of HCO3 to whole plant photosynthesis than to protoplast photosynthesis at similar external pH values ( Newman & Raven 1993). CA activity increases with increasing external pH ( Newman & Raven 1993) and the lower levels detected in intact protoplasts (external to, but associated with plasmalemma) may hinder sufficiently rapid conversion of HCO3 to CO2 at pH values greater than 8·0, reducing the rate of supply of CO2 to the chloroplast and, hence, the observed rate of photosynthesis.''


Does this mean that at ph`s above 8, plants have a harder time using co2 and therefore a reduced growth rate, or simply that if the difference in ph the dic causes is insignificant that the growth rate is reduced (which we all know already)

Thanks

This might help: plasmalemma= cell membrane

I think mainly what this passage suggest is the cell membrane's CA acitivity alone is less capable at higher pH's. With the whole plants, seem to not be.

I'm not sure because I'm not sure which article you are referring to.

Regards,
Tom Barr