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Carbonate hardness

Discussion in 'Advanced Strategies and Fertilization' started by Roman, Mar 3, 2005.

  1. Roman

    Roman Lifetime Charter Member
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    My tap water is 12°dKH.

    When I do weekly 50% water change it goes down to about 9 degrees which is consistent with about 6 degrees before water change. This is in one of those small, high light, CO2 tanks. About 55L (15G), 3.6 WPG (3*18W of FL with reflectors), very high plant biomass (check the picture in my gallery :D ).

    Now, what I'm wondering :confused: is, is it possible to hit Ca or Mg deficiency with that carbonate hardness?
     
  2. Gill Man

    Gill Man Prolific Poster

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    Re: Carbonate hardness

    I'm not sure how your dKH is changing other than if you were using very soft water to cut it with. As for a calcium or magnesium deficiency, you need to also check the value of your dGH. Ca and Mg are not related to dKH.
     
  3. Roman

    Roman Lifetime Charter Member
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    Re: Carbonate hardness

    Maybe I jumped with the conclusion about KH being used by plants. It's about 6 degrees before water change and it was like that for some period of time, but I measured tap water just recently. Need to do some more consistent tests to see what's going on here.
    Those snails are eating my carbonates at night :D

    General hardness was usually 2-3 degrees higher than carbonate hardness, but then again I didn't measure that one for ages. I'll buy a new test and use it once or twice and find what I probably know or doesn't matter anyway.

    Yes, Ca and Mg are related to GH, my bad :eek:

    But let we say theoretically that dGH is 14°, can I get Ca or Mg deficiency. If there would be only Ca ions or only Mg ions...is it possible?
     
  4. Laith

    Laith Lifetime Charter Member
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    Re: Carbonate hardness

    Theoretically it is possible. My tap water here is at a GH of 15 but according to the water report, has very little Mg in it. So instead of the "usual" 3 or 4:1 Ca to Mg ration, mine is like 12:1.

    Therefore I add Mg to my tank.

    However, as far as I have heard, this is rare and usually if your GH is above 6 or 7 (some say 5) then you'd have enough Mg and Ca.
     
  5. Roman

    Roman Lifetime Charter Member
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    Re: Carbonate hardness

    The reason for asking this is here: Nutrient deficiency

    I did grow Nesaea much, much better in the past when I didn't know much about fertilizing and stuff, ironically. I know what kind of symptoms belong to lack of main macro-micro nutrients, but then again they all look similar to me. :confused:

    I'm trying to eliminate elements one by one and my latest suspect is that something is missing or is not sufficient in my micro-nutrient fertilizer for which I don't know all quantities of elements in it. I tried dosing more, but the results were not satisfying, so something must be missing. In general plants doing fine but I know for sure they could do better, so please help me get my sanity back :)

    There is enough N, P, K should be sufficient (some from fertilizer and some from KNO3), Ca & Mg from tap water (it's hard)???, Iron (from fertilizer - if the info on quantity I got is true, then it should be sufficient)???.

    Boron ???

    Btw, I ordered CSM from Greg, so maybe this will solve the problem when I get it, but I still want to pinpoint the problem.

    Main suspects for the moment are Iron and Boron.
     
  6. m lemay

    m lemay Prolific Poster

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    Re: Carbonate hardness

    This situation isn't as rare as you might think. I ran into an Mg deficiency in my tank but with a slightly different situation. My tap water is
     
  7. ajpearson

    ajpearson Junior Poster

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    Re: Carbonate hardness

    Get some CO2 :)
     
  8. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Re: Carbonate hardness

    Well, it's rather a simple process to rule out deficiencies.
    Simply add more of he suspect beyond a limiting level.
    A smidge of Boric acid, 1/8" teaspoon of Epsom salt, and a bit more General trace fert will do it.

    But as a poster already noted, CO2.

    When the KH moved around, you have a CO2 issue (as a rule).
    Why would a plant bother with using HCO3, when it could get plenty of CO2?
    (Very) Probably because you are not adding enough CO2.

    Regards,
    Tom Barr
     
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