Calling Chemistry and Math Pros

C

csmith

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I do the math because it keeps me involved without being in the tank. It sounds rediculous, I know, but I have a bad habit of constantly messing with my plants. This keeps me from messing with things all the time. I'm not all that familiar with Walstad's ways other than it's the "natural" approach, so I don't quite understand what's being conveyed.

Tug, 10 out of 5 people are dyslexic so you're in good company. :rolleyes:
 

Tom Barr

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A natural approach is more, well, no CO2/little inorganic fert input and lower light in general.
Often uses a rich sediment like soil etc, ADA AS ........

But you can dose the water column(see the article/EI section here).
The main reason for choosing it which is both good or bad depending on your goal/personality type, it relies a lot on patience.
Growth is slower, but input is less than a plain aquarium without plants.

Things grow, but 10X slower.

No water changes, no testing, feed fish, add water for evaporation, clean filter.
That's not bad. Pruning is little, not much growth, not much need to prune.

No work in other words.
Good goal for many.


Regards,
Tom Barr
 

aquabillpers

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csmith;52166 said:
I do the math because it keeps me involved without being in the tank. It sounds rediculous, I know, but I have a bad habit of constantly messing with my plants. This keeps me from messing with things all the time. I'm not all that familiar with Walstad's ways other than it's the "natural" approach, so I don't quite understand what's being conveyed.

My response to your post was not meant to be a criticism of you. Growing aquatic plants is a great hobby that can be approached in many different ways, from the highly technical where the appropriate placement of a CO2 diffuser can be debated, to the other extreme where the diameter of gravel particles can be a matter of contention.

I think the important thing is that the plant grower gets pleasure and satisfaction from his hobby.

Whether to climb the North Face or walk up the "easy" winding path depends on whether one is more interested in seeing the sunrise from the top of the mountain or in meeting a physical challenge, I'd think.

Bill
 

Tom Barr

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aquabillpers;52205 said:
Whether to climb the North Face or walk up the "easy" winding path depends on whether one is more interested in seeing the sunrise from the top of the mountain or in meeting a physical challenge, I'd think.

Bill

Each path has its own reward.


Regards,
Tom Barr
 

Tug

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Speaking as a rookie.

The more we know about one, the more we know about the other, the more we understand the mountain. To me, they are complementary paths. This best describes it for me personally.

"Happiness is a journey, not a destination."
 
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C

csmith

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aquabillpers;52205 said:
My response to your post was not meant to be a criticism of you. Growing aquatic plants is a great hobby that can be approached in many different ways, from the highly technical where the appropriate placement of a CO2 diffuser can be debated, to the other extreme where the diameter of gravel particles can be a matter of contention.

I think the important thing is that the plant grower gets pleasure and satisfaction from his hobby.

Whether to climb the North Face or walk up the "easy" winding path depends on whether one is more interested in seeing the sunrise from the top of the mountain or in meeting a physical challenge, I'd think.

Bill

No harm taken. As I said, I know it sounds extreme but it does keep me from messing too much with other things I probably shouldn't be. I consider it more walking up the mountain with blinders so I don't stop at each and every possible stop, focusing on the ascent and not every little rock in the dirt, thereby making it to the top in time to catch that sunrise.
 

Tom Barr

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Tug;52223 said:
The more we know about one, the more we know about the other, the more we understand the mountain. To me, they are complementary paths. This best describes it for me personally.

"Happiness is a journey, not a destination."

Thumbs up on this view as well.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 
C

CL_

Guest
Tom Barr;52170 said:
A natural approach is more, well, no CO2/little inorganic fert input and lower light in general.
Often uses a rich sediment like soil etc, ADA AS ........

But you can dose the water column(see the article/EI section here).
The main reason for choosing it which is both good or bad depending on your goal/personality type, it relies a lot on patience.
Growth is slower, but input is less than a plain aquarium without plants.

Things grow, but 10X slower.

No water changes, no testing, feed fish, add water for evaporation, clean filter.
That's not bad. Pruning is little, not much growth, not much need to prune.

No work in other words.
Good goal for many.


Regards,
Tom Barr

This is what I do in a couple of my shrimp tanks
http://i47.tinypic.com/e0pt1c.jpg
http://i48.tinypic.com/f3cqiq.jpg
http://i48.tinypic.com/1674hog.jpg
Works well for me.
Cats drink from the tanks about a half gallon of week, so that counts as water changes, right? haha Otherwise I would only top off.

Just noticed that you put up haagenize's design for the forum header. Looks nice :)
 
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