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Baking soda question.

Discussion in 'General Plant Topics' started by barbarossa4122, Apr 16, 2010.

  1. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    Hi,

    My Ph is 6.6 and I would like to rise it to 7. How much baking soda do I need to add to my 55g tank? I will only do this once a week with my WC. Btw, my Kh is 1 and Gh 3 after WC. I am already using Equilibrium and the ultimate Gh booster. Or, should I leave the Ph alone? I have heavy planted goldfish tanks.
     
  2. Gbark

    Gbark Guru Class Expert

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    pH seams ok to me, i run mine at 6.3 to 6.5 and this climbs to 6.8 to 6.9 with lights off. Adding baking powder will also increase your kH as well. ;)
     
  3. Philosophos

    Philosophos Lifetime Charter Member
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    I'll second not worrying about it. pH really isn't a big deal to plants so much as we like to think, and raising the KH isn't a nice thing to do if you've got soft water fish.
     
  4. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    I am thinking to add about 2tsp with wc.
     
  5. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    Hi Dan and Gbark,

    OK, advice taken. Thank you.
     
    #5 barbarossa4122, Apr 16, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 16, 2010
  6. csmith

    csmith Guest

    X baking soda times Y water = Z kH rise.

    Can someone fill in the variables please? :)
     
  7. deucebiggss

    deucebiggss Guru Class Expert

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    I read somewhere that 1 tsp of baking soda will raise 50 liters (13gal) of water by 4 degrees.
     
  8. Tug

    Tug Lifetime Charter Member
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    Don't Worry - Be Happy

    Hi barbarossa,
    1tsp of NaHCO3 will raise KH by one degree in a 55 gallon tank. I'm trying real hard not to have an opinion about this. So, here is a link to a calculator. Find out how much, "X baking soda times Y water = Z kH." Go to, http://www.dataguru.org/misc/aquarium/calKH.asp for more information.
     
  9. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    Hi Tug,

    Thanks.

    I think I can guess what your opinion is:)
     
  10. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    pH And KH Maybe GH Certainly

    Hi,

    I also do not think it makes much difference though goldfish (GF for Detritus Mulm) tend to like the water a little harder. :)

    In this case I think it is the general hardness I am concerned about, a heavily planted tank with fish noted for robust growth, I think bumping the general hardness 4-6 degrees would be helpful. :gw

    Biollante
     
  11. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    Hi Bio,

    I am bumping the Gh with 1 tsp of Equilibrium and 1 tsp of Ultimate Gh booster at every WC. My plants are doing great and the goldies are really, really tough. At least mine are for some reason.
     
  12. ibnozn

    ibnozn Subscriber

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  13. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    Hi,

    Thanks:)
     
  14. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    How Long?

     
  15. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    #15 barbarossa4122, Apr 18, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 18, 2010
  16. Biollante

    Biollante Lifetime Charter Member
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    Goldfish, Strong Bones, Strong Fins, Good Scales--Got GH?

    Hi,

    I do not think adding the baking soda dry will hurt, but I always mix it in aquarium or change water first.

    I do not think ammonia test kits pick up the ammonia bound in chloramines, NH2Cl, to test for it in your tap water I think you would need first to treat the tap water with SeaChem’s Prime at label strength then test. :)

    For goldfish, a good rule, based on my experience (probably something I was told along the way) is to start with general hardness at least 7-dGH, making sure I have raised it at least 2-dGH myself. I never worry about testing for this purpose, I have a reasonable idea what comes out of the tap and I know what I add. :cool:

    Biollante
     
  17. barbarossa4122

    barbarossa4122 Guru Class Expert

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    Hi Bio,

    I do use Prime and only add baking soda after wc. I did treat the tap water with Prime and did a test...........it shows 0 ammonia. Btw, tanks are OK now.
     
  18. Philosophos

    Philosophos Lifetime Charter Member
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    Prime is tricky. It's hard to tell if you're reading sequestered ammonia or getting a false positive from excess as happens with hydroxymethanesulfonate. I haven't seen anyone test the issue.

    Either way, a water report usually answers the question. One of those failing, a great method for figuring out if your tap water contains chloramine would be treating with sodium thiosulfate then testing for free ammonia.
     
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