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Are there any creatures that thrive in low PH acidic water?

Discussion in 'Fish for Planted Tanks' started by SwampGremlin, Oct 20, 2015.

  1. SwampGremlin

    SwampGremlin Member

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    Been trying to find somthing looking on he net about this i really do not see much. but i figure there has to be a place on earth with acidic water that has creatures that thrive there.


    This question is directed at fresh water planted tanks. I would not mind having a fish or verts that arent bashful when it comes to dosing co2 just curious if there is some exotic pet that actually prefers 5.7-5.9 ph water that you wouldn't have to worry about stressing out .And i understand theres the other side of it at lights out then it would be stressed when ph rises again but i just wanted to ask to see if someone would say the only creature that doesnt care what the ph is and it will not be stressed is (fill in the Blank) idk.


    Or even information on what fish species seems to be able to handle low ph the best ect.
     
    #1 SwampGremlin, Oct 20, 2015
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 20, 2015
  2. burr740

    burr740 Micros Spiller
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    It's not really about the PH, more to do with high CO2's influence on respiration.
     
  3. SwampGremlin

    SwampGremlin Member

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    I see thanks for clarifying. Is there any that thrive in high co2 enviroments then?
     
  4. Solcielo lawrencia

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    Paracheirodon sps., i.e. cardinals, green neons, neons, et al., can tolerate pH as low as 3.5. Anything lower and mortality is 100%.
     
  5. SwampGremlin

    SwampGremlin Member

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    Ok cool I apreciate the feedback .


    Thanks.
     
  6. Tristin

    Tristin Junior Poster

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  7. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Killis, many Florida native fish species, any with air bladders, Gouramis, guppies, livebearers etc.
     
  8. SwampGremlin

    SwampGremlin Member

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    Thank you for your reply. i loved the orange killis i had but they jumped out of my rimless so fast think 5 of them lasted 3 days
     
  9. Tom Barr

    Tom Barr Founder
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    Most of those fish will jump, a 5 gallon rimless and killis is asking for it. Not many things will not in a small tank like that I know of.
     
  10. 1077

    1077 Guru Class Expert

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    Gourami, Yes, But I do not think Livebearer's will thrive in acidic water's nearly as well as they do in hard alkaline water based on a few decades of raising them.


    Cannot speak to the killi's for I have not kept them.


    Currently keeping Hi fin lyre tailed Sword's along with some feeder guppies for spotted leaf fish.
     
  11. SwampGremlin

    SwampGremlin Member

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    Thanks for your replies guys
     
  12. Monilovesplants

    Monilovesplants Prolific Poster

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    I'd also consider that some fish that are tank raised have been raised in higher ph so putting them straight into a lower ph isn't necessarily the best thing to do. if they were raised in a higher ph, they'll probably do well there due to the breeder's techniques and generations of fish being raised at that ph. I have Discus and they are known for a lower ph but they are now getting raised at a higher level so mine stay in about 6.8 in my planted tank and are quite happy in their green range of ph. I've seen comments of Discus being in 7.6 to 8 ph [breeders told them to put them at that level].
     
  13. brrrpr

    brrrpr Subscriber

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    Wow ! Interesting, where did you get this data about extreme chemical conditions ?
     
  14. brrrpr

    brrrpr Subscriber

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    This last book looks wonderfull, if anyone had a copy of it.
     
  15. Adam Edmond

    Adam Edmond Junior Poster

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    Yes.Because different animals thrive on different conditions.For example, shelled animals—including mussels, clams, urchins and starfish—are going to have trouble building their shells in more acidic water, just like the corals. Mussels and oysters are expected to grow less shell by 25 percent and 10 percent respectively by the end of the century. Urchins and starfish aren’t as well studied, but they build their shell-like parts from high-magnesium calcite, a type of calcium carbonate that dissolves even more quickly than the aragonite form of calcium carbonate that corals use. This means a weaker shell for these organisms, increasing the chance of being crushed or eaten.
     
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