Are all chelated Fe's the same?

crystalview

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Sep 6, 2008
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I was using seachems Fe but I recently read a post by Tom that recommended to products I could not google.
I really like the color my red lotus got after I started dosing for a couple of months. I have been out of it for 2wks and it is turning green, instead of a mottled red.
 

JLR Plant Newb

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Jan 27, 2009
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A place to buy ferts

I Think I had similar problems finding ferts that are commonly known and referred to by people in the hobby.
I don't know where I ran across this site but they have pretty much everything I needed and they were very prompt in their shipment even though it was between Christmas and New years.
Planted Aquarium Fertilizer

What I understand is that not all chelates are the same and the poor quality ones will fall out and begin to rust.
That is just hear say though coming from me.

Anyhow, hope the link helps you out.

Best wishes

Justin Reude
 

SuperColey1

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Feb 17, 2007
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There are different quality chelators which mean that the bound items become unbound easier with the poorer chelators.

Shouldn't be a problem within the tank on the amounts we dose. Can be a problem in the solutions if you mix 3 months worth and use tap water etc.

Just mix 1 month's worth and use DI water and it should be OK.

UV sterilisers can also break up the poorer chelators from what I understand.

AC
 

crystalview

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Sep 6, 2008
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So most of you are using dry Fe? I should have ordered it when from plant "Planted aquarium Ferts" I was using Seachems liquid iron and that wasn't bad just costly. Do you mix your dry iron with liquid? That state to do that at the above web site, is there a reason?
 

VaughnH

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Jan 24, 2005
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Iron is one of the micro nutrients plants need, a trace element. A good trace element mix will contain an adequate amount of iron, so dosing more isn't likely to be worth the effort. The idea that extra iron is needed for red plants is a myth (in my opinion).

To qualify my comment a bit: I purchased my CSM mix from Greg Watson, back when he was selling dry fertilizer chemicals, and back when he was selling it with extra iron in the mix. So, my CSM+B is also +some more Fe. I can't be sure that the extra iron in that mix is helping my plants or not. Greg very soon quit selling it that way, explaining that it was not found to be beneficial. When I run out of my CSM+ mix I will soon find out if the next trace mix I get works as well without the extra iron.
 

Tom Barr

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aquabillpers;33367 said:
Great graph!

That's another argument against higher pH.

Thanks.

Bill

Not really, look at the CaCO3..................KH, not pH is the issue.
We can change the pH with CO2 with zero effect on the KH.

So KH is more the issue here.

Regards,
Tom Barr
 

JLR Plant Newb

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Jan 27, 2009
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crystalview;33376 said:
So most of you are using dry Fe? I should have ordered it when from plant "Planted aquarium Ferts" I was using Seachems liquid iron and that wasn't bad just costly. Do you mix your dry iron with liquid? That state to do that at the above web site, is there a reason?

There are a couple reasons for mixing with liquid. One is because it's in high concentration and you just need to dose small amounts. This allows you to be more accurate. Also it allows the nutrient to be dispersed more quickly and evenly in the tank.

Someone, please correct me if I'm wrong.

Best wishes,
Justin Reude