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  2. We are after as many aquarium plant images that we can get, doing so will assist us in completing the aquarium plant database.

    https://barrreport.com/threads/aquatic-plant-images-wanted.14374/
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Any Bryophiles? Requesting help with wild moss ID. Also a non-moss plant. Pic heavy!

Discussion in 'Aquatic Plant Species' started by snarkingturtle, Aug 30, 2017.

  1. snarkingturtle

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    UPDATE
    Pool moss (and possibly stream moss) is probably Leptodictyum riparium (Streamside Leptodictyum moss, Wet Thread Moss
    Macrophyte is probably water speedwell Veronica catenata
    Willow moss is Fontinalis dalecarlica or Cupped Water Moss / Slender Water Moss
    I would like to ID two mosses shown in the photo below:
    FHoLHav.jpg
    The Java moss and the willow moss (Fontinalis antiphyretica EDIT: actually Fontinalis dalecarlica) are for size reference. I am interested in the 'stream moss' and the 'pool moss'.

    The pool moss came from a log in a vernal pool at the edge of a large marsh in southern Ontario. It's been growing in my tank (low tech) for awhile where it looks like this: 80AaOLy.jpg

    Under (home-brew quality) magnification:
    F5yyldt.jpg hNkK1KT.jpg

    The 'stream moss' came from a wooded stream over limestone in southern Ontario:
    KG4lUhA.jpg
    In situ:
    DSi1VrX.jpg QQdMuom.jpg
    in tuperware:
    xTpldyv.jpg

    under magnification:
    pf2B7db.jpg
    2u9p9tp.jpg
    U0AjREx.jpg

    Bonus: If anyone wants to ID this plant I would also be grateful:
    yQoeJMq.jpg

    Same location as the stream moss.

    p5wqSZe.jpg
     
    #1 snarkingturtle, Aug 30, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2017
  2. snarkingturtle

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    I've returned to the stream to get better photos of the macrophyte and I even managed to find one solitary bloom:

    bFs1Ujl.jpg

    JS8PnLR.jpg
    kBYCD0R.jpg

    Also got some photos of the stream most sporophytes:

    Vx8nvEV.jpg
     
  3. snarkingturtle

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    I think I have made a good stab at IDing the pool moss, will reveal at the end.
    New photos of moss leaves:

    Stream moss:
    9BD9Ff8.jpg
    nKNf4xO.jpg

    Pool moss:
    J4yffh6.jpg
    wpLK4Vk.jpg

    If anyone is wondering how I make these images, my sister made me this device for taking microscopic images using an iphone:
    KQrrLTb.jpg

    Ok, so I think the pool moss is Leptodictyum riparium (Streamside Leptodictyum moss, Wet Thread Moss). There's photos on flogrow, and the leaf and habitat match those in Common Mosses of the Northeast and Appalachians. It's even offered for sale by Aquasabi.

    The stream moss is still a mystery. It's obviously similar to Leptodictyum in leaf size and shape but there are differences. I'm going to try it out in my tank to see how they compare in the same environment.

    Now, about the vascular plant:

    When I went back and thinking about it more afterwards, I realized that I have seen this species or one like it before about 400 km away in SW Ontario on NW shore of Lake Erie in a ditch. It formed floating mats there. I looked back through my photos and found a couple. In this case the growth is not shaded and instead is in direct sunlight:
    11xht9p.jpg

    tSThiCz.jpg
    I've also seen it (pretty sure,anyway) in another place between those two sites.

    Mosses, well those are hard. This plant though, seems like it should be fairly easy and it's starting to drive me crazy.
     
  4. DutchMuch

    DutchMuch Junior Poster

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    I swear to God this will be/is one of the most information journals concerning wild plants on the net right now.
     
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  5. Jason King

    Jason King barrreport.com
    Staff Member Administrator

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    @snarkingturtle great thread regarding the wild plants and that macro device has got me puzzled but it's doing a great job :)
     
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  6. snarkingturtle

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    @Jason It's made with two lenses from a laser pointer embedded into a sheet of Plexiglas. The phone rests on top with it's camera looking through the lens. A lower sheet of plexiglass acts as the stage and focus is adjusted by moving it using butterfly nuts. The specimen is placed on another unattached piece of plexiglass so that you can move it around.

    I posted my question over at the Native Plants subforum of N. American Native Fishes Association forum and I believe I've got the correct ID of the macrophyte: water speedwell Veronica catenata (= Veronica anagallis-aquatica?) is the closest match. The Minnesota Wildflowers page has a photo of a colony that looks pretty similar to my last set of images. Also, the description at Michigan flora is pretty bang on for the first set of images:

    This is quite a variable species. Most of our specimens are ± glandular-pubescent in the raceme and on the upper part of the stem (var. glandulosa Farw.) The lower leaves and leaves on basal offshoots sometimes are short-petioled. Rarely plants have alternate racemes, as in V. scutellata. Submersed plants (especially in flowing water) frequently have very limp and rather elongate aquatic leaves; these are opposite so such plants ought not be confused with a Potamogeton, which they might otherwise resemble.
    I'm starting to suspect that the stream and pool moss are the same species. Still not 100% on the ID and still hoping a moss person will come along and confirm or deny.

    I've also come to the conclusion that my Willow Moss is Fontinalis dalecarlica or Cupped Water Moss / Slender Water Moss rather than Fontinalis antipyretica. There's not a lot of photos online, but there's a couple in the Société québécoise de bryologie page.

    EDIT: There's a thread at TPT with a little information about growing speedwell in a tank.
     
    #6 snarkingturtle, Sep 7, 2017
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2017
    burr740 and Jason King like this.
  7. snarkingturtle

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    I guess this might as well go here with the other moss... The Potomogeton in my 20 just straight up insta-dissolved so I thought I'd swing by the river and grab another. While looking around, what should I find? Fissidens fontanus! :D
    K43DRxP.jpg
     
  8. snarkingturtle

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    I'm new to moss IDs so caveat emptor for those that follow. As I mentioned in my 20 gal journal, I've found 3 other Fissidens species in my area without too much difficulty. It's been an extremely wet year, so I now have Fissidens osmundioides growing in my driveway:
    full?d=1505182083.jpg
    A nicer patch in the woods:
    full?d=1505182083.jpg

    In a shady wet spot I found Fissidens adianthoides (Maidenhair Fissidens):
    full?d=1505181494.jpg

    It's a slightly bigger species. Along a river there was Pixie Pocket Moss, Fissidens bryoides growing on rocks at the edge of the water. This Fissidens is tiny (it's "dusty" from silt from slightly higher water:
    MmC5bhf.jpg

    full?d=1505182721.jpg
    full?d=1505182721.jpg

    I went to check out a creek but the water was too high and fast for me to see much. I stuck my camera into fast water to take a picture of moss I could feel growing on a boulder:

    rwFGgxw.jpg

    There's F. bryoides again plus another unknown moss and this weird bristle-like plant that I think is a macro algae of some sort. I'm very curious to know what it is.

    In my 20 gallon I'm trying to see if I can grow F. bryoides, fontanus, and osmundioides. I haven't found room for any of the F. adianthoides yet.
     
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  9. ForTheHalibut

    ForTheHalibut Member

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    Fantastic thread. I wish NANFA would do an issue on plants.
     
  10. Dennis Singh

    Dennis Singh SynKing!

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    I wish i could've introduced you to the rested Benito Tan.
    A good moss enthusiasts next in line or somewhere good in these expertise i'd contact miremonster on apc
    Also robert something, fissidens kingdom on Facebook.
     
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