This site is supported by the advertisements on it, please disable your AdBlocker so we can continue to provide you with the quality content you expect.
  1. We are after as many aquarium plant images that we can get, doing so will assist us in completing the aquarium plant database.

    https://barrreport.com/threads/aquatic-plant-images-wanted.14374/
    Dismiss Notice

Another led question....

Discussion in 'Lighting' started by kassysimon, Aug 27, 2013.

  1. kassysimon

    kassysimon Junior Poster

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    I'm using a 180w led fixture that runs 60 x 3w LEDs.. All LEDs are 10000k so I was thinking of supplementing this light with a t5 red coloured light or with a 6500k plant specific t5 fluoro.

    Or is there a different toe of t5 tube I can use for the red spectrum?

    Or do you think it's not worth worrying about providing the red spectrum and just leaving the 10000k on their own?

    Thanks.
     
  2. Solcielo lawrencia

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,007
    Likes Received:
    43
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    Is this a freshwater tank? Do you want the color to be more white?

    If you add red, you must also add green. Otherwise, you'll get ugly colors. Red + green + and blue = white light.
     
  3. PK1

    PK1 Guru Class Expert

    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2005
    Messages:
    154
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    A number of years ago I had a never ending battle with green water, until I read somewhere (was it in D. Walstad's book?) that blue spectrums contributed to this problem. At the time I had a few 10k bulbs in my 4-bulb fixture, so I changed them all to 6500K. Continued water changes, etc. and the problem finally got eradicated a week or two later.

    I still have a UV filter and two diatom filters from my battle with the green water at that time that I haven't used in years... I was going through so much diatomaceous earth that I was buying in bulk!
     
  4. Solcielo lawrencia

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,007
    Likes Received:
    43
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    It's highly improbably that blue wavelengths were the sole cause of the algae bloom. The most probably cause was the increased amount of light available for photosynthesis. With only blue light, all of it was available for photosynthesis. Compared with white lights, only part of the visible light is used for photosynthesis. So at the same light output, white light has less light available for photosynthesis.
     
  5. kassysimon

    kassysimon Junior Poster

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    Yes. Thisis for a planted tank.

    But putting looks aside, what is better for plant growth? Will the 10000k lights suffice or should I supplement it with red?
     
  6. Solcielo lawrencia

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,007
    Likes Received:
    43
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    You don't need to but it depends on the wavelength of red. A red between 620-680nm will be used for photosynthesis. However, chlorophyll uses more of the blue-violet wavelength so a violet tube would be better than a red one.
     
  7. kassysimon

    kassysimon Junior Poster

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    A violet tube?

    Do mean like a black light?
     
  8. Solcielo lawrencia

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,007
    Likes Received:
    43
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    No, black lights emit invisible UV light; the violet you see is what doesn't get filtered. A violet tube is a purple tube ranging between 400-420nm.
     
  9. kassysimon

    kassysimon Junior Poster

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    Thanks Solcielo lawrencia.


    I have the following light capabilities available to me.
    Given that this is a 10 ft x 2ft x 2ft tank which combination would you use?
    The only way i could get these options to work was using the WPG rule.

    The below is what i can do with my LED fixtures. I can separate 12 and 48 LEDs per fixture and run them either together or separately.
    The fixtures use 3W 10000k LEDs with 60 LEDs per fixture and im running 4 fixtures. The t5 are 6500k tubes.
    Im running pressurized CO2 and dailey EI.

    Given my total volume the WPG works out like this using a combination of LEDs and T5s.

    60 leds only 2.52wpg
    48 leds only 2.02wpg
    12 leds only .50wpg
    60 leds + t5s 3.45wpg
    48 leds + t5s 2.94wpg
    12 leds + t5s 1.43wpg
    t5s only .93wpg
    t5s X 2 fixtures 1.85wpg
     
  10. Solcielo lawrencia

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2013
    Messages:
    1,007
    Likes Received:
    43
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    LEDs put out more light per watt than do fluorescent bulbs so it isn't comparable. Using lumen output is slightly better, though with mixed color lights (fluorescent mercury vapor tubes and white LEDs) the indicated lumens are distributed across the wavelengths so less light is actually used for photosynthesis. The depth that the light must penetrate will determine how much light you need.
     
  11. kassysimon

    kassysimon Junior Poster

    Joined:
    May 5, 2012
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    Local Time:
    2:42 AM
    Thank you very much
     
Loading...

Share This Page

  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice