ambient room lighting in relation to photo period?

trong

Lifetime Charter Member
Lifetime Member
Mar 14, 2007
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i'm not sure which catigory to post this ? so i'm coming to you. I'm noticing GDA still, after a couple blackout periods decreasing photo period from 11 to 8 hours along with light from 4 t-5HO's to 2 t5's. i've been using a modified EI now for over 9 mo. 50 % H2o changes weekly. extensive questing to achieve optimal co2 which has reduced BBA or (red algea) which i'm still working on with a new entry into the diy co2 mixer, showing promise. my tank is an 80 gal with 68 gal of h2o heavily planted w/some 32 species of mostly very soft h2o plants erios, belem ect.. and seen much change in the last months for the good. my ? is what effect does strong ambient light (from windows) have on a photo period in reguard to the spore known as GDA. in my observation i think lots. what do you and the guru team think?
i ask this ? with much respect as my biggest growths in this hobby have come from you and this site.
thanks troy
 

jonny_ftm

Guru Class Expert
Mar 5, 2009
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In my expierience, ambian light will cause issues if too intense and not well understood. In its self, it is not a problem, but you should account for it when it is considerable in intensity.

I, personally, found much better resulty when photoperiod was overlapped with daylight on highly exposed aquariums. You then only have to increase CO2 and EI to suit your growth and decrease algae. Exposing the aquarium to a long daylight intense period followed by a T5 photoperiod in the evenning makes it very hard to manage algae.

On my nano, highly exposed to daylight, I use a photoperiod from 12h-20h. But, from 7h-12h, I cover it. That way + my light position adjusted, makes it useless to clean front glass: I never cleaned it for 3 months now.

In 2-3 weeks, i'll try to stop covering it between 7-12h to see. But, in my expierience, I know it is a failure, especially in summer. Moving to a photoperiod from 8h-16h or 18h in these situations is the only confortable alternative I found
 

Biollante

Lifetime Charter Member
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Jun 21, 2009
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Surprise, AZ
Ambient Light And Lots Of It!

Hi Troy,

Certainly not a Guru and not nearly as smart as Jonny.

However, I do live in a place with lots of ambient light, so much ambient light I do not 'light' some of my tanks.

Yes in my experience the light needs to be accounted for and can be a major source of energy.

If you have :cool: or can buy, :) borrow, :D or steal :eek: a par meter it helps in targeting the light/CO2/fertz. I am fairly new to PAR meters, but wow. :)

Without a PAR meter it is a matter of observation and adjustment.

I wish I could be more helpful, but that is why I am available and not a Guru. :gw

Biollante
 

engine50

Junior Poster
May 17, 2009
26
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FL
If we naturally consider the mechanics of performing a "Blackout" as an algae corrective tool, then intense ambient light is a consideration possibly not given enough attention to detail. The basic aquarium location guidelines may not well address the issue as it pertains this specfic facet of the hobby. In my bright yet diffused room I'm planning to install blackout shades on at least one window. I have one window with light from early A.M. till noon, then another facing Southwest picking up afternoon light. This then gives the tank a very long indrect ambient light photoperiod.

That's my un-guru like two cents.
 

jonny_ftm

Guru Class Expert
Mar 5, 2009
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Many do run tanks even at direct sun light. The most important is to account it as light and adapt dosing/CO2 and artificial photoperiod. Otherwise, there will be an unbalance with too much light leading to algae issues