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All My Panda Corys Died

Discussion in 'Fish for Planted Tanks' started by santiago, Jan 27, 2018.

  1. santiago

    santiago New Member

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    My son has a heavily planted dutch/jungle Fluval Spec V with one betta. It's been 5 months and we been through green hair algae, diatoms and green spot algae. To battle all the algae issues we had to covert our low tech to high tech by adding more stem plants, r/o water, co2, surface skimmer, dry fertilizers and better lighting. Now the tank is running very smooth!!!! Guess what?? Now he wants more fish in his tank!!! My plan is to move the betta to a new cube tank and add new fish to his tank.

    After I moved my betta from my Fluval Spec, I bought four Panda Corys to my established planted tank and in the first week, two of the corys died. Then on the second week, the third and the fourth one died. When the first two died, I asked the owner of the shop what happen and he asked about my PH and KH. Luckily I tested my water after they died and I told him that my PH is 6.2-6.6 and my KH is 2-3. He replied that my water is too soft so the fish died from PH shock. I told him that I used 90 percent R.O. and 10 percent tap. He suggests increasing the tap because most pets stores use more tap than R.O. water. He suggested increasing the mixture to 50-50 and try to increase the PH to 7 and KH to 6.

    Do need to increase the tap mixture to raise the PH and KH? Or do need to adjust the CO2 lower than one bubble per half a second? Also, when I acclimated the fish with the drip method for about an hour and once the fishes were in the water, they were hiding and breathing rapidly, is this a sign of PH shock? He also said that cory doesn't do well in the soft water he suggested getting tetras or rasboras. Since my tank is now empty, what should I do help set up the next fish? I really don't want to mess up again please help me out.
     
  2. Dennis Singh

    Dennis Singh SynKing!

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    I believe the panda cories out of other corydoras need higher temperatures. What were yours?

    I have killed these myself without co2, because of temperature i believe.
     
  3. santiago

    santiago New Member

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    I kept the temperature about 76 degree.
     
  4. Dennis Singh

    Dennis Singh SynKing!

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    I googled it and I am wrong on temperature, so maybe others can chime in.
     
  5. Allwissend

    Allwissend Article Editor
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    Well I would start by researching fish on seriouslyfish or the like, instead of asking the fish store. For example, most corys come from soft water environments, so a statement like that should raise a red flag :mad:.
    http://www.seriouslyfish.com/species/corydoras-panda/
    "A temperature of around 75°F and a pH of 6.5 should be fine. Filtering the water through peat is useful, as is the use of RO water." for breeding so....

    As for the fish died from pH shock:rolleyes:, I would challenge him to explain how that happens... with a change from pH7 to pH 6.6. What is the physiological mechanism that takes place and what is the pathology of a 0.4 pH change in surrounding water for a Corydoras? Maybe in hobby books from the '40s...people like this get on my wick... can you tell ?

    It is more likely that the fish were stressed out to begin with , housed in improper hard water at the fish store and then had to readjust to soft water in your your aquarium. Hiding and increased breathing and darting around after being added to the aquarium is just a sign that they are stressed out, that is normal if just added.

    The most important tip when adding fish in aquariums with CO2 is to close the CO2 that day, and increase it slowly over several days. They will adjust, but need some time and it helps to not have the added stress of the CO2 to deal with.

    Another point, slowly increase the number of fish. Give the bacterial population time to adjust to the fish population.
     
  6. santiago

    santiago New Member

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    Allwissend, thanks for your reply. I think that's a very interesting advice by shutting off the CO2 and slowly increasing it over several of days. When I'm going to add my new fish I will close off the CO2 and slowly bring it back. If all the local shops have hard water in their tanks then don't I need to help the acclimating by mixing more tap in my tank? Since my tank is fishless do you think its best to change the ratio of RO to tap to be similar to the fish shop?
     
  7. Allwissend

    Allwissend Article Editor
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    If you do not have a strong reason to keep the aquarium softwater, then go for it. It will be one less parameter for fish to adapt to. After the aquarium is stocked, you can reduce the KH of the water over several weeks.

    Another thing to pay attention to, NH4 is not so toxic when the pH is low (CO2, low KH) but converts to the more toxic NH3 when ph is higher (low CO2, high KH). Idea being, make sure the aquarium is cycled before adding sensitive fish.
     
  8. santiago

    santiago New Member

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    I was told that with softer water its better plants growth and it helps with the plant's intake of CO2. I never knew when Ph and KH are higher ammonia is more toxic. My tank has been cycled for a while and I never had an ammonia spike since its been cycle. Maybe because I had one betta since the tank was set up. When I get more fish I will keep my eyes on the ammonia. Again thanks for the great advice.
     
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