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75 gallon low light question

Discussion in 'Are you new to aquatic plants? Start here' started by JohnSC, Jun 19, 2009.

  1. JohnSC

    JohnSC Junior Poster

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    I have a 75 gallon low light tank, currently with about 1.47 wpg (110 watts of compact fluorescents). I'd like to add some more light but keep it in the low light range.

    One problem with lighting a 75 gallon tank is the distribution of the light. Since my fixture is at the back of the tank, the front half gets less light.

    In order to solve both problems, I was considering adding a 40 watt single tube fluorescent fixture (with a white plastic reflector) to the front of the tank. This would bump up my overall wpg as well as add some light to the front.

    Does this sound like a good idea? Does anyone have low light 75g tanks...if so, how do you light them?

    Thanks!
    John
     
  2. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    A common fix is to raise the lights up a bit for a more even spread. I don't know if that's possible in your case though. It also may not apply since you don't have a high light issue but raising it up a bit may let you also move what you have forward a touch to even things out even more.

    -
    S
     
  3. JohnSC

    JohnSC Junior Poster

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    Part of the problem is that I use a glass canopy. The canopy hinges run along the centerline of the tank. This means that I can't move my fixture toward the center.
     
  4. shoggoth43

    shoggoth43 Lifetime Charter Member
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    What about removing the hinges and just using the glass plates instead? ( assuming the hinge material is a black plastic ) You could then just slide the lights back out of the way when you had to open the hood.

    -
    S
     
  5. Gerryd

    Gerryd Plant Guru Team
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    Hi,

    Adding another bulb will work, but please note that more light will drive higher growth rates, and may need a corresponding increase in c02 and/or macros and micro ferts.

    I don't think the center hinges will affect the light that much if you center your existing fixture.. Have you tried it? How does it look?

    Can you remove the hinge material like shoggoth43 suggests?

    Do you need the glass covers or can you remove them??
     
  6. JohnSC

    JohnSC Junior Poster

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    Remove the hinges...of course! So obvious I didn't think of it. It's amazing how much of a difference in makes to move the lights forward a couple of inches. Thanks for the tip.

    Even though this improves the light distribution, I'm still considering adding another bulb to get a bit more light. I'm hoping that if I do need some CO2, I can use Excel.

    - J
     
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